It Is Done.

The end of an epic.  I finally clipped the chains on Swingline.  As it should be, it didn't go down without a bit of a fight, and over the last few sessions it's taught me a few lessons.

Entering the crux.  Photo by Elodie Saracco.

 

First, when working a long term project, your tactics might have to change.  Once upon a time, I had to learn to recover at the "rest" just before the long crux sequence.  To send, I had to shake a time or two and move on.  Even though I had been getting there relatively fresh for awhile, I still felt like I needed to rest.  Mistake.  Sometimes it pays to just keep climbing.

Crux.  Photo by Elodie Saracco.

Second, like I mentioned, I was getting to the crux section relatively casually.  I've been getting thru the first 13 or 14 moves of the 15 move crux pretty casually for some time as well.  When I finally made the decision to try a big link rather than try sending (should have done that a year ago), I realized that I might have to try hard up there.  I'd been expecting it to happen as casual as the moves below.  Before I stepped off the ground for this go, I made that decision.  When I arrived at the move, I reminded myself to try harder.  It worked.

Exiting.  Photo by

Elodie Saracco

I exited the crux onto the jugs in the upper headwall, with only 2 bolts and a few moves of 5.11 or so between me and sending.   Reaching to the first hold on the headwall, I quickly realized that I couldn't feel a damned thing.  My fingers were completely, disconcertingly numb.  Back down to the jugs.  Try 5 different ways to warm them.  Nothing.  Feel the hold again.  Ok, maybe feel isn't the right word.  Paw at the hold with useless ice chunks.  Shit.  Ok, fact is, this section is easy.  I've said many times that if I were to fall up here I'd karate chop myself in the throat.  Being as that doesn't sound pleasant, I set off, watching my hands to make sure they were making contact with the holds.  And then it was over.  It's done.

Shit.  What now?

I imagine I'll find something.